Future Queen, Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, turns 40 at the height of her popularity

Future Queen, Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, turns 40 at the height of her popularity

Born Catherine Middleton and nicknamed Kate, this former art student, commoner, entered the most scrutinized family of the United Kingdom in 2011. For many, the wife of the eldest son of the heir to the throne now symbolizes the future of the monarchy.
 
This brunette, always impeccable, who fulfills her official commitments with a smile, reflects an image of reliability at a difficult time for a monarchy that is closing ranks in the face of scandals and divisions.
 
Kate again delighted her fans and an already enthusiastic press during a Christmas concert at Westminster Abbey broadcast on television, dedicated to those who worked during the coronavirus pandemic. She accompanied on the piano the singer Tom Walker who interpreted his song For These Who Can't Be Here.  
 
Kate and her husband William, who will celebrate his 40th birthday in June, have gained visibility since the beginning of the health crisis: in videoconferences with caregivers or by recounting their confined life with their children George, Charlotte and Louis - in a vast house in the country - and the ups and downs of home schooling.
 
With restrictions eased and 95-year-old Elizabeth II scaling back, they have been making more official appearances, from the world premiere of the new James Bond movie to the COP26 climate summit.  
 
Kate has also developed themes that are dear to her such as early childhood and, alongside William, mental health and environmental protection.  
 
The couple's former private secretary, Jamie Lowther-Pinkerton, cited her down-to-earth, unflappable side as one of her assets. 
 
She takes the time to talk to people, he told The Times newspaper, comparing her to Queen Elizabeth II's mother, a symbol of British resistance during World War II: When things need to be done, she does them.
 
At the beginning of her relationship with William, at the Scottish university of St Andrews, Kate's social origin, coming from the middle class, was much talked about, as well as her ability to integrate into the world full of traditions and conventions of royalty. 
 
But she has, at least in public, given the impression of bowing willingly to the obligations of her role in the royal family - quite the opposite of her sister-in-law Meghan, disliked by the tabloids and not very popular with the British. 
The media has been quite kind to her, especially since Meghan and her husband Prince Harry moved away from the royal family and to the United States.
 
Some attribute the difference in the media's treatment of Kate and Meghan to a contempt for those who open up easily, against the grain of a very British phlegmatism. 
 
However, Kate has also faced some criticism, especially for her impeccable appearance. The novelist Hilary Mantel even accused her of looking like a shop window model without personality.
 
Kate, however, is seen in the royal family as someone who can be counted on at a delicate time, between Harry and Meghan's explosive confidences and the accusations of sexual assault aimed at the queen's second son, Prince Andrew.